Jim Jones Says He Can Do More Than Jay-Z

Jim Jones Says He Can Do More Than Jay-Z

    As we previously reported, Jim Jones recently made the cover of Complex Magazine and in the interview he made some very controversial statements. Well the outtakes of the interview are even better. When Complex asked Jim Jones about people comparing the way Dame Dash is pushing him, to how Dame pushed Jay-Z when Jigga was coming up, Jones said…

    "Shit, that’s a great comparison. If you look at it, Dame did alright for Jay-Z. That old nigga has cake, he’s paid. So how bad can that be? Dame made history, he started Roc-A-Fella records, and I’ve seen it. I watched the first Roc-A-Fella fitted he had on his head that he made from a 3rd Avenue store when it was just stitched on and shit. He’s a historical person, he’s done it and he’s done it well. He not only did it with Jay, but he did it with Kanye; he set a precedent for niggas that want to become something in this game, who come from the street and want to make a lot of money. Dame is a beast—when I was younger, I always admired his hustle."

     That reply seems pretty decent but Jim Jones isn't one to bite his tongue. He continued…

    "I can do more. I don’t need to use rap as a crutch for the rest of my life. I can rap and I can do the business, I can model and do the business, I can own a production team. It’s a big difference over here, [Jay-Z] can’t do that. He’s not that savvy, not that fly, I don’t think he’s that handsome. All he has is a gorgeous flow—my momma raised a gorgeous child."

    He certainly doesn't lack confidence but sometimes people let it affect their perception of reality. Jay-Z isn't savvy? Come on. Read the rest of the outakes from Jim Jone's Complex interview, Click Here


As we previously reported, Jim Jones recently made the cover of
Complex Magazine and in the interview he made some very controversial
statements. Well the outtakes of the interview are even better. When
Complex asked Jim Jones about people comparing the way Dame Dash is pushing him, to how Dame pushed Jay-Z when Jigga was coming up, Jones said…

    "Shit, that’s a great comparison. If you look at
it, Dame did alright for Jay-Z. That old nigga has cake, he’s paid. So
how bad can that be? Dame made history, he started Roc-A-Fella records,
and I’ve seen it. I watched the first Roc-A-Fella fitted he had on his
head that he made from a 3rd Avenue store when it was just stitched on
and shit. He’s a historical person, he’s done it and he’s done it well.
He not only did it with Jay, but he did it with Kanye; he set a
precedent for niggas that want to become something in this game, who
come from the street and want to make a lot of money. Dame is a
beast—when I was younger, I always admired his hustle.
"

     That reply seems pretty decent but Jim Jones isn't one to bite his tongue. He continued…

    "I can do more. I don’t need to use rap as a
crutch for the rest of my life. I can rap and I can do the business, I
can model and do the business, I can own a production team. It’s a big
difference over here, [Jay-Z] can’t do that. He’s not that
savvy, not that fly, I don’t think he’s that handsome. All he has is a
gorgeous flow—my momma raised a gorgeous child.
"

    He certainly doesn't lack confidence but sometimes people let it affect their perception of reality. Jay-Z isn't savvy? Come on.

December 4th: not only is it Hova’s birthday, but today marks the official nationwide on sale date for our December/January issue. By now you’ve probably gotten to know our too-cool cover girl Zoey Deschanel, and read our controversial Jim Jones cover story, where the Dipset Capo throws all your favorite rappers under the bus. But wait—there’s more!

Jones had a lot to say, and believe it or not, he actually spoke on a number of things that never made it into the magazine. So now we’re hooking you up with some of the juiciest outtakes: Jimmy talks more about Jay-Z, gives his thoughts on Jadakiss signing to the Roc, addresses Dame Dash’s financial woes and more. Trust us, the extras are chock-full of gems. Read on to see why when Jimmy talks, everyone listens…

Complex: You said that at one point, Jay-Z was your favorite rapper and then he went out “like a dud.” When did your perception of him change? 


Jim Jones: When he went from being a boss to an employee and he had no reason for doing that. I took a job with Kevin Liles and them because I had all the reason in the world to do that—I’m a hustler and I wanted to learn the whole game from the inside out. At that point, when Jay went corporate, he already knew the whole game. Roc-A-Fella was on a roll that nobody could probably stop, ever. So when you downshift and you go from wanting to run your own ship to being on a crew on somebody else’s ship, I don’t care how big the ship is, it’s not the same. You lose the power. You lose the equity, and to me it’s like you just sold your soul. You fell into the loop. And you supposed to come from the street—we’re supposed to always set our own precedent and do it the way we wanna do it.

Complex: I see…

Jim Jones: That’s why he made so much money and sold so many records. Not to be a part of their world; you always have to do it your way, and let them come to our world. Convert to their world and you’ll never get business done that way. You have to have a business mind but for the most part when it comes to your artistry and who you are and your persona—it’s like, shit I ain’t changing for nobody, why should I? As long as this billing is coming in, you should be happy and I should be happy.

Complex: How do you feel about Jada going to the ROC. Does that surprise you?

Jim Jones: I don’t know, some people got to do business moves. Some people don’t have enough power to do things in their own regard, so they do things to create some type of hype. Some type of niche that would reel people in to get people to look at them. I guess he felt that him doing the Roc-A-Fella thing would give him that. Me, myself, I don’t think it would’ve given him anything whether he would’ve done a deal with a real label or not. [Roc-A-Fella] is not even a real label no more. Like I told you, L.A. Reid owns it. You smell me? They sold it. That’s why Dame is in here with us—he made money off that. Who owns it?

Complex: Are you cool with anyone from Roc-A-Fella?

Jim Jones: There isn’t really any Roc-A-Fella. Wheres Roc-A-Fella signed to? Who owns Roc-A-Fella? Jay don’t own Roc-A-Fella. L.A. Reid owns Roc-A-Fella and there’s no Roc-A-Fella artists. Not even Jay, for that matter. He hasn’t sold any real incredible records for him to be saying that he’s the best in the world. People are selling circles around his sales, but his publicity and his star power has overcome anything. Then you know, he got the Beyonce factor, which is a great factor for him.

Complex: Have you ever run into Beyonce?

Jim Jones: Nah, we don’t deal with that. That’s a different part. We stick to what we’re doing. Smell me? We don’t violate that. Gangstas don’t do that. No women no children. Smell me?

Complex: Going back to Dame getting money, there have been reports that he’s in financial trouble…

Jim Jones: For us, it’s a joke to even be here, and to say he’s having financial troubles…meanwhile we’re living multi-million-dollar lives. I tell people, my house is pretty big. Most people call it a church, but Dame’s apartment is bigger than my house. So, I keep asking people, if that’s the case, how broke can he be? It’s just the media, it’s what they get paid to do. They don’t promote the positive.

Complex: This year, it seems like Dame has been really focused on trying to make you a star. Some people have compared his drive to the way he pushed Jay-Z at the beginning. How do you respond to that?

Jim Jones: Shit, that’s a great comparison. If you look at it, Dame did alright for Jay-Z. That old nigga has cake, he’s paid. So how bad can that be? Dame made history, he started Roc-A-Fella records, and I’ve seen it. I watched the first Roc-A-Fella fitted he had on his head that he made from a 3rd Avenue store when it was just stitched on and shit. He’s a historical person, he’s done it and he’s done it well. He not only did it with Jay, but he did it with Kanye; he set a precedent for niggas that want to become something in this game, who come from the street and want to make a lot of money. Dame is a beast—when I was younger, I always admired his hustle. I can do more. I don’t need to use rap as a crutch for the rest of my life. I can rap and I can do the business, I can model and do the business, I can own a production team. It’s a big difference over here, [Jay-Z] can’t do that. He’s not that savvy, not that fly, I don’t think he’s that handsome. All he has is a gorgeous flow—my momma raised a gorgeous child.

Complex : You always point out that people dress like Jim Jones, but there’s also a lot of people who dress like Kanye and Lupe. How do you feel about that?

Jim Jones: Shit, more power to them, but I don’t indulge in that world. That world is more of a nerdish-type of world. No disrespect to nobody, but that’s not what we do on this side. I come from the hood, so I get fresh and I get fly and it’s a little bit more comfortable than others. That type of dressing starts to get tight at certain points. That’s not us. But some girls like that, ya dig?

Complex: These young cats are getting their chains snatched left and right. What advice can you give to folks like Yung Berg?

Jim Jones: If you that bold to talk about it, then you should be bold enough to know that there might be consequences to suffer if you get caught slipping. And they said that Berg’s chain was fake too. That Voltron shit. But you know, 95% of the rappers out there are rocking fake jewelry. These niggas got chains and diamonds on bigger than Zamunda. And they don’t have a fucking sale on the SoundScan. With no sales, how can you do shows? With no shows, how can you get real money?

Complex: On your new album, there’s a few songs for the ladies. What type of women are you trying to attract right now?

Jim Jones: Like the one I got at home. Very sexy, intelligent, street-savvy and knows how to put it on when she needs to.

Complex: You keep bringing her up…is this the “one?”

Jim Jones: Yeah, definitely. 


Complex: How long have you been together with her?

Jim Jones: Four years. We’re not married yet. We’re getting there though.

Complex: How many days out of the week do you go back to Harlem?

Jim Jones: Once every two weeks. I’m busy, so I don’t be going there like I used to. I’m trying make a lot of money here and do a lot of things. And above all, when you’re in the hood, you’re subjected to what goes on in the hood and you don’t want to get caught slipping and lose everything you built for making a stupid mistake over a calculated risk. Who wants to end up in jail with millions of dollars over trying to prove a point because my ego was big? I still keep all my niggas around me. And when I’m feeling good and I need a breath of fresh air, you can catch me on 115th, and you catch me on St. Nick. You can catch me riding through with some big cars. But as far as going back to the hood, how many times you get to see the president?

Complex: You’re ad-libs are always on point. I’d say the “Kalina” ad-lib from “Reppin’ Time” is my favorite [Ed. Note: Robert Kalina is Jim’s lawyer]. Which one is yours?

Jim Jones: The ad-libs are part of my music; it explains my rhyme, that’s why I do it. I tell people I’m not the most talented nigga at rapping, I’m talented at hustling and shit like that, so I have to do things that make up for my mis-talent. In my music, I’m explaining things I’ve been through, so the ad-libs explain what I’m talking about. There’s really not one favorite, I just like when I nail them. But “Kalina” has to be one that stands out because it seems like every year for the past 8 years, I’ve been calling his name.

Complex: Are you worried about how your new album sales will stand up against the likes of 50 and Jay?

Jim Jones: They better watch out. The pressure is on them. I got the same amount of advertising power that they’re going to have. Columbia is about to spend some money. It’s going to be a battle for PO’s in the store; it’s going to be a battle. People are going to see me as much as they see them, and I’m handsome, ya dig? I don’t know about them other niggas. Girls like a good picture, so at the end of the day, girls just might buy it because they think I look fly on the cover.

Complex: There was a rumor that there was another part II to “Swagger Like Us” coming out with Jeezy and Andre 3000 on it. How you feel about that?

Jim Jones: When’s the last time anyone has dressed like any of those people? Where are we going with this? I would exclude Andre 3000, because niggas are never going to dress like him anyway. He’s on his own other shit. But for the most part, we set the precedent. Why you think they got me on the cover of Complex for? We about to blow niggas’ minds. These niggas know I can do it, and they can’t and they know girls aren’t going to be mad at it. They’re going to be like, ah man, I can’t even get up on that shit, he’s taking it too far to the point where I can’t be involved. [Laughs]. We’re going to have fun with this one for a bit.

Complex: You also have a fitness DVD coming out?

Jim Jones: I’m going to start shooting soon. I’ve been getting in shape for the past few years. It helps me to not be so frustrated. I’ve got pretty good at it. It’s a billion dollar industry. It’s just another check in my pocket.

Complex: Are you ever in the gym with those meathead dudes?

Jim Jones: These dudes that take steroids, lookin’ like wrestlers? I’m not into all that. For the most part, I know sex sells, so I try to stay in shape. Plus my position in this rap game is a touchy position, so I might have to put hands on somebody every now and then. I got to be on my Ps and Qs. I’ve got kicked out of three gyms already so I got a trainer in my house, I keep it fair. Most of the dudes around me are in shape, and I hate to be the littlest nigga around.

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